Anvil or Hammer


200 Snatches

Posted in Kettlebells by Mike on November 13, 2007

20/20 – 2:14
20/20 – 2:04
15/15 – 2:23
15/15 – 2:27
10/10 – 1:43
10/10 – 2:04
5/5 – 1:12
5/5 – 0:31

Time: 14:40
Avg HR: 167
Max HR: 189

I also hit the Physical Therapist today, well not hit, went to see. I got 30 minutes of his time. Basically he taught me some foam roller exercises. I’m starting think that he doesn’t have the slightest clue what to do a with a guy who is relatively healthy. I wonder if my money would have been better spent at PerformBetter.com getting a few DVDs.

Last, I said this at farmstrength:

“I’m not a nutritionist or any kind of guru but I have one absolute for everybody. You WILL NOT lose the weight until you decide that it is your single most important goal for you in the gym. Until then, you are wasting time. ”

I’m repeating it here because it is something I truely believe. Feel free to disagree.

6 Responses to '200 Snatches'

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  1. Chris Rice said,

    “I’m not a nutritionist or any kind of guru but I have one absolute for everybody. You WILL NOT lose the weight until you decide that it is your single most important goal for you in the gym. Until then, you are wasting time. “

    I’m repeating it here because it is something I truely believe. Feel free to disagree.

    This is a real gem – it should say this in every facility where people come to train and lose weight.

  2. Scott Styles said,

    Yep, it has to be goal #1, outside the gym as well.

    I am very happy with the ability of my physical therapist to identify specific imbalances and what is causing them. I found actually aligning his exercises recommendations with the rest of my training to be something that requires work on my part. The training needed to support pressing 70lbs overhead with one arm is different than the rehab needed to be able to zipper your coat again.

  3. Ben said,

    Ya some PT’s are worthless nerds. The 2 dudes I went to when I had patellar tendinitis preached how bad squats are on your knees and gave me some shitty static stretches. I would really love to meet a PT who lifts somewhat seriously on the side. On a side note Tommy Kono knee sleeves will save your knees although they are a bitch to put on.

  4. Mike said,

    Chris,
    Thanks, you deserve at least some credit on it. When you told me about your son and pointed out that some strength loss was inevitable. That started the ball rolling in my head that I needed to put other concerns aside for a while.

    Scott,
    I agree with you, outside the gym as well. I didn’t want to get too all encompassing, family and stuff is more important. Earlier in the same post I did give diet more credit.
    I think the PT I’m working with just doesn’t understand what I am going for. I don’t have any real complaints, the couple I had, he gave me the stretches and off I go. I’m gonna finish off the month with him, see what he wants to do and just kind of evaluate it from there. I’m an abnormal client. We’ll see what Chris turns up yoga-wise too.

    Ben,
    It’s interesting how much people bag on the static stretches but it seems to be all the PTs know too. More art than science I guess. I haven’t tried any sleeves or anything like that. Fortunately, I don’t need much support gear quite yet. I’ve seen a lot guys with those sleeves though, the sure are popular and seem to work.

  5. Chris Rice said,

    Read “Power Yoga” by Beryl Bender Birch – usually available from the library if you don’t want to buy it. It’s a little bit Zen in places perhaps but her explanation of static stretching exactly matches my experiences with injury, soreness, etc. For me at least, with my competitive nature, static stretching was just an injury waiting to happens – which it usually did. It was only after I tried Astanga and began to generate significant heat (sweating like a pig actually) that I found a way of stretching that worked for me and my goals. But the truth is, there’s more too it than “stretching” – the breath control and strength I got from it have been surprising to say the least. I don’t bother with any of the more esoteric aspects, just the physical ones. When I first start doing it after a layoff – I don’t generate much heat but after a week or two, as I start flowing and using the bandas or locks better, I begin to sweat heavily during the workout and then things begin to happen. I warm up quicker, I can move deeper into the postures, and can manage to do the vinyasas – which is a movement that transitions you from one pose to another. If you think those don’t demand some real abdominal strength, you truly do have abs of steel. The routine I do is only 30 minutes and doesn’t have you doing things that are simply impossible for me to achieve. It’s one more tool in your toolbox is all, but for me, it has become my “fix what’s broke” tool for my body.

  6. Mike said,

    I will definitely pick up a copy of that.


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